Northrop's Historic Pipe Organ

Northrop's Historic Pipe Organ

About the Northrop organ

The historic Northrop organ, Aeolian-Skinner’s Opus 892, was built between 1932 and 1936, and is one of the most notable concert-hall pipe organs in the United States. Its 6,982 pipes comprise 108 ranks and 81 speaking stops, ranging in size from 32 feet tall to the size of a pencil. The public face of the organ is the console, with four keyboards, a pedalboard and about 225 separate controls. The Northrop organ is the third-largest auditorium-based Aeolian-Skinner extant in the U.S. today. It was awarded the prestigious “Exceptional Historic Merit” citation by the Organ Historical Society in 1999.

 

Photo by Tim Rummelhoff

When the Minnesota Orchestra—then called the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra—made Northrop its home beginning in 1930, the organ was used often, but by the late 1960s, it began to fall into disrepair. When Northrop’s building renovation began in 2011, the organ was carefully cataloged, crated and moved to storage, where it sat for several years waiting for the funding needed to repair and re-install the instrument. A generous bequest by the late Dr. Roger E. Anderson provided funds for the reinstallation of the instrument in the chambers above the stage and behind the proscenium. The reinstallation has been painstakingly carried out by Foley-Baker and Associates and culminates in the October 12 and 13 grand inaugural concerts by the Minnesota Orchestra. For more information about Northrop, visit northrop.umn.edu.

Minnesota Orchestra Staff