Meet a Musician: R. Douglas Wright

Meet a Musician: R. Douglas Wright

Minnesota Orchestra member since: 1995
Position: Principal Trombone
Hometown: Hopewell, VA
Education: New England Conservatory; Boston University

In June, you’ll be one of four soloists from the Orchestra in James Stephenson’s Pillars, a concerto for low brass. What role did you have in this piece’s creation?
Jim and I have known each other ever since our freshman year at New England Conservatory. He was a terrific trumpet player back in those days and has since turned his considerable talents toward composition. We spent a lot of time playing music together throughout our college days in brass quintets and large ensembles. We even went on an orchestra tour together to Israel. So, there’s lots of history there. When Jim told me about a potential commission to write a low brass concerto, I got really excited and begged him to let us premier it. The concerto was to be in memory of Bill Zehfuss, the longtime principal trombonist of the Charleston Symphony, who had passed away several years prior, and the funding for the commission was being raised online. I sent word out to every trombonist and tuba player I know—all of us in the Orchestra’s low brass section helped spread the word. Many wonderful friends and family members of Bill’s and lots of low brass players chipped in to make this wonderful commission possible. Even a few non-low brass players chipped in.

What should the audience listen for during this piece?
In standard orchestral repertoire, the low brass section gets to play everything from beautiful, soft chorales to big, powerful climactic sections of symphonies, and just about everything in between, usually in a more supportive role. Jim really knows the sounds the low brass section is known for and he has done a terrific job of letting each member of the section shine individually as well as showing off what we can do together. We even get to play the melody!

What is particularly exciting about performing a concerto for low brass?
I find it gratifying and inspiring each and every time I get to play with my good friends in the low brass section. To get to do so out in front of the orchestra is a thrill! Since we rarely get the spotlight for more than a few measures at a time, I’m guessing that will present its own set of challenges. However, I anticipate that moving from the back row to the front of the stage for a week is going to be a lot of fun. It’s no doubt exciting for our viola section as well, who might appreciate the break from our bells aiming at the backs of their heads.

Tell us about a proud moment in your career?
I was extremely fortunate to have gotten the chance to perform with Leonard Bernstein as he conducted his next-to-last concert. The man was a musical giant and an inspiration unlike any other I’ve ever encountered. I still get chills thinking about what it was like to work with him. Kids, look him up on YouTube. You’ll be amazed!

What advice would you give to someone interested in pursuing a career in music?
Pursuing a career in music is challenging, to say the least, because there are so many people who want to do it. It takes a lot of work and dedication, perseverance, and a bit of luck, and some good teachers—I had some great ones! Even then, it can be tough. However, if you are driven and passionate about music, I can think of nothing more gratifying than touching people’s lives through music.

What do you do when you are not performing?
I teach trombone at Northwestern University’s Bienen School of Music in Evanston, Illinois. So, you’re liable to find me at the airport from time to time. I also enjoy throwing the football with my son when he’s home from college, watching my daughter play soccer, and walking through the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum with my wife. The air out there is amazing! 


Click here for more about R. Douglas Wright.

Click here for more about the world premiere performances of James Stephenson's Pillars.

Minnesota Orchestra Staff