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Osmo Vänskä /// Music Director

Recent Articles: Featured

Meet President & CEO Michelle Miller Burns

As the Orchestra launches its season opening concerts, President and CEO Michelle Miller Burns welcomes audiences to the 2018-19 season.


"Hello, I’m Michelle Miller Burns, President and CEO of the Minnesota Orchestra, and it is my pleasure to welcome you to the Orchestra’s 2018-19 season.

Recently, I had the privilege of seeing Music Director Osmo Vänskä and the musicians in action on the Orchestra’s South Africa tour.

I was impressed by their commitment to excellence throughout the tour. Not only in performances, but also in their interaction with students and audiences in every community we visited. It was inspiring to see those musical and cultural connections being made.

I know that connectivity is part of the magic here at Orchestra Hall and I look forward to being a part of it this year.

Osmo and the musicians have prepared an outstanding season for you with a focus on vibrant, American music. Some of it new. Some of it tried and true. All of it performed masterfully.

Whether you are a long time subscriber or a first-time concertgoer, I hope you will introduce yourself to me and the musicians before or after your next performance.

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you at Orchestra Hall."

Welcome our Newest Musicians

The Minnesota Orchestra is excited to welcome three additional musicians to its roster this season. Violist Jenni Seo has been appointed Assistant Principal Viola, a position held since 2010 by recently-appointed Principal Viola Rebecca Albers; cellists Minji Choi and Erik Wheeler have been appointed to section positions.

Jenni Seo, viola

Korean violist Jenni Seo comes to Minnesota after performing in the viola section of the Baltimore Symphony during its 2017-18 season. She is a frequent substitute with the New York Philharmonic, Los Angeles Philharmonic and New York City Ballet orchestras, and makes reoccurring appearances at the Music at Menlo, Montecito, Bad Leonfelden, Keuka Lake and Perlman Music Program festivals. She has appeared on stage alongside Itzhak Perlman, Lynn Harrell, Donald Weilerstein and David Finckel, as well as members of the Cleveland, Takacs and Juilliard String Quartets. She has been presented by the WQXR Midday Masterpieces series, the Harvard Club of New York and at the Neue Gallery. The winner of the 2011 ASTA National Solo Competition, Seo received undergraduate and graduate degrees from The Juilliard School, where she was a student of Cynthia Phelps, Heidi Castleman and Steven Tenenbom, and served as principal viola of the Juilliard Orchestra.

Minji Choi, cello

Korean cellist Minji Choi joins the Minnesota Orchestra after playing with the Santa Barbara and Eugene Symphonies. She began studying cello at age six and gave her first solo performance at the age of twelve in Kumho Art Hall. She studied at the Korean National University of Arts under the tutelage of Myung-Wha Chung and Kangho Lee. She has also studied with Philippe Muller at the Paris Conservatory, where she received her master’s degree, and she recently earned an artist’s diploma from the Colburn Conservatory of Music, studying with Clive Greensmith. She has won numerous competitions including the Ehwa- Kyunghyang Competition, Ye-Jin Competition, Nan-Pa Competition, Eum-Yoen Competition and the Tea-Gu Broadcasting Competition, among many others. As a soloist, she has been featured with the Teagu Philharmonic Orchestra, Guri City Orchestra, Gunpo Prime Philharmonic Orchestra and Karol Szymanovski Philharmonic Orchestra. She has played as a substitute musician with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the New York Philharmonic under the baton of Alan Gilbert. She has also served as principal cello of the Paris Conservatory Orchestra, Pacific Music Festival Orchestra and Verbier Festival Orchestra. 

Erik Wheeler, cello

Houston-born cellist Erik Wheeler began his musical studies with Diane Bonds at the age of five. He has also studied with Steve Laven, Lynn Harrell and Brinton Smith, and with Desmond Hoebig at Rice University, where he earned his undergraduate degree, and at The Juilliard School with cellist Richard Aaron. While at Rice, he performed Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations with the Shepherd School Chamber Orchestra as the winner of the school’s concerto competition, and served as principal cellist for the Shepherd School Symphony Orchestra. He has performed chamber music alongside world-renowned artists including Jon Kimura Parker, Philip Setzer, Lawrence Dutton, Timothy Eddy, Kim Kashkashian, Susan Starr and Charles Wetherbee, and has appeared as a soloist with numerous orchestras including the Houston Symphony. Wheeler’s parents are both musicians, and his father Lawrence was Co-Principal Violist of the Minnesota Orchestra in the 1970s. 


 Seo and Choi join the Orchestra for Season Opening concerts on September 21 and 22; Wheeler begins his new position with the Orchestra in January 2019.

A Moment with Emanuel Ax

Seven-time Grammy-winning pianist Emanuel Ax joins us on September 21 and 22 to open the season with Brahms’ exquisite Second Piano Concerto. We spoke with him about the challenges and joys of this extremely difficult piece, and about his 44-year relationship with the Minnesota Orchestra.

When you see that your next concert venue is in Minnesota, what do you think about?
Minnesota was one of the first places I ever played with a major orchestra—at Northrop Auditorium and with Stanislaw Skrowaczewski (in 1974 and 1977). It was very exciting for me, a great thrill. I’ve always loved both Minneapolis and Saint Paul, and I’m just excited about coming back.

The program from one of Emanuel Ax's first performances with the Minnesota Orchestra

How have you grown as a musician since those early performances?
Well, I don’t have the slightest idea, to be honest. I keep practicing, hard. But I keep feeling that I have so much more to learn, and that hasn’t changed at all. I hope I’m playing more intelligently and communicating better than I did then. But I can’t really say; that’s more of a question for people who come to the concert. 

What are you looking forward to about the upcoming Minnesota Orchestra concerts?
I haven’t been to Minnesota since I played with the Orchestra’s musicians during the lockout. So, I’m glad that people are back and working and it’s all good news.  I’m very excited to see Osmo Vänskä again and I’m very excited to be with the Orchestra, so I’m anticipating it with a lot of pleasure. And of course I’ll be nervous. I hope I play well. 

How do you stay at the top of your game?
I think all pianists are working hard and working ahead because we have a lot of notes to play, so I’m always trying to do that and be ready when the concert comes. And with all of the traveling that I do, the first thing my management team does is line up practice time at each place when I arrive. I plan my days around that. It’s really the most well-planned part of my life! 

What is the greatest challenge about Brahms’ Second Piano Concerto?
The challenge is simply that it is very, very difficult. It’s hard physically. It’s hard mentally. It’s long. It’s very involved and like a piece of big chamber music. You have to be very connected to everything else that is going on onstage.

What is your greatest joy about the piece?
Brahms’ Second Concerto is so evocative and so wonderful and so deep that it’s always a pleasure and a thrill to work on it…but scary! I first performed this piece almost 40 years ago. The Brahms concertos have been part of my life for a very long time.

This season, the Minnesota Orchestra is highlighting American composers. How would you describe American orchestral music?  
Well I think that’s very hard to answer. I think there is an unmistakable flavor of American music that you hear in composers like Bernstein, Copland, Roy Harris and others from that era, a kind of American sound that is very open, very frank, very welcoming and very hopeful. But I think that now the world of composition is so international that it’s difficult to characterize by nationality. People from America go to Vienna to study. People from Vienna come to New York. People from the Far East go all over the world. There are teachers of all nationalities working everywhere. So, I think in that sense, the world of music has become very international.

What are some of your latest projects?
Recently, I’ve been performing the Brahms trios with Yo-Yo Ma and Leonidas Kavakos, and that’s been a wonderful, wonderful thing. Yo-Yo and I have been playing together in one thing or another for over 40 years now. Being onstage with him is one of the absolute greatest things that happened in my life. I’m grateful to whatever powers made it possible. And we both fell in love with Leonidas, so it’s been really fun over the last couple of years. 

And I’ve learned a couple of new pieces that I like a lot. One in particular that I performed last year is by a Viennese composer named HK Gruber.

Otherwise, one of the most important things in my life is that we have grandchildren. They are three-and-a-half year old twins, and we’re very blessed. I’ll see them this coming weekend. We haven’t gotten them much into music yet, but I’m hoping to learn more songs that they can sing along to, so I’m going to be working on that in the next bit.


Hear Emanuel Ax with the Minnesota Orchestra, September 21 and 22 >>

Experience New Music With Us

The modern symphony orchestra has been built on centuries of musical traditions. Orchestral musicians have each trained for thousands of hours in classical techniques which have stood the test of time. Listeners might find familiarity and comfort in works by the great pillars of orchestral composing, such as Beethoven, Mozart, Tchaikovsky and—especially here in Minnesota lately—Sibelius and Mahler. However, in this art form, there will always be room for new ideas, new voices and new sounds. 

Here at the Minnesota Orchestra, we've always found great value creating and performing new music. We've commissioned or premiered more than 300 compositions, and we even have a full "Future Classics" concert each year dedicated to new music during the annual Composer Institute. During our 2018-19 season, we have programmed more than a dozen works that the Orchestra has never performed before, each of them new to many of our musicians' repertoire and our audience’s ears.  

How will you decide which ones you want to experience for the first time with us? Here’s a quick look through our season to help you choose. Click on titles to learn about performance dates and details.

Below are three great opportunities to be among the very first in the U.S. or even the world to experience new works:

John Harbison: What Do We Make of Bach? for Orchestra and Obbligato Organ

This world premiere celebrates the newly-restored pipe organ at Northrop on the campus of the University of Minnesota, with organ virtuoso Paul Jacobs as the soloist in his Minnesota Orchestra debut. And if you love this piece, there are more opportunities this season to hear Harbison’s music, because he is our 2018-19 Featured Composer.

"The orchestra is given the task of establishing the premise, and the organ part introduces an idea of the voice of the old German master speaking in modern terms…The organ part consists of both the strangest, most bizarre elements of the piece as well as those that are most rooted in tradition.” – Paul Jacobs

 

Mark-Anthony Turnage: Martland Memorial for Percussion and Orchestra

Martland Memorial is a unique tribute to the late British composer Steve Martland. Its composer and soloist—Mark-Anthony Turnage and Grammy-winning percussionist Colin Currie, respectively—were both friends of Martland, who died in 2013. The Minnesota Orchestra’s performances will be the U.S. premiere.

Geoffrey Gordon: Prometheus

The U.S. premiere performance of Prometheus features the Minnesota Orchestra’s own bass clarinet player Timothy Zavadil as the work’s soloist in a rare opportunity to hear a solo bass clarinet with the Orchestra. Plus, there is another new piece on the same program: Tómasson’s Second Piano Concerto (see below for more).

Other works new to the Orchestra’s library this season include: 

John Adams: Gnarly Buttons

A frequently-appearing name in Minnesota Orchestra programs, composer John Adams’ features solo clarinet in Gnarly Buttons, spotlighting clarinet virtuoso Michael Collins in a lively work with small orchestra and a little bit of banjo. Preview the piece, with Collins as soloist >>

Kareem Roustom: Ramal

On the same program as Gnarly Buttons, but in a complete shift of style, Syrian-American composer Kareem Roustom’s Ramal is rhythmic and bustling, inspired by a pre-Islamic Arabic poetic meter. It will be the first time a piece by Roustom is performed by Minnesota Orchestra. 

Kevin Puts: Inspiring Beethoven

What was Beethoven thinking as he penned the joyful, vibrant, emotional notes of his Seventh Symphony? This is Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Kevin Puts’ imaginative response to that question.

Artie Shaw: Clarinet Concerto

Music from “The King of Clarinet,” Artie Shaw, has been heard on many a summer festival concert here in Minnesota, but this season Principal Clarinet Gabriel Campos Zamora brings Shaw’s Clarinet Concerto to the stage in January with Music Director Osmo Vänskä—who began his career as a clarinetist—on the conductor's podium.

Florence Price: Symphony No. 3

Composer Florence Price was the first African American woman to have her music performed by a major orchestra. Her southern roots and religious background run deep through her work, especially in this symphony that was commissioned at the height of the Great Depression.

Mason Bates: Garages of the Valley

Dedicated to former Minnesota Orchestra Music Director Edo de Waart, who conducts these concerts, Mason Bates Garages of the Valley was inspired by the masterminds who worked tirelessly behind the scenes on some of our greatest advances in technology (Apple, HP, Google, etc.) 

“We all have an image of zillions of lines of computer code whizzing down a screen, and I needed a way to bring that to life in a fresh and evocative way.” –Mason Bates

 

Sean Shepherd: Silvery Rills

Silvery Rills is a quick concert opener that gets its name from the words of “Home Means Nevada,” the composer’s home state song.

Haukur Tómasson: Piano Concerto No. 2

Honoring Minnesota’s many Nordic influences, this concert combines the talent of our Finnish Music Director Osmo Vänskä with Icelandic composer Haukur Tómasson and Icelandic pianist Vikingur Olafsson, who performed the premiere of Tómasson's Second Piano Concerto.

Victoria Borisova-Ollas: Kingdom of Silence

Another name new to the Orchestra’s library, Victoria Borisova-Ollas’ Kingdom of Silence is a dreamlike perspective of the afterlife, a kind of lullaby in memory of another composer, Nikolai Korndorf.


Browse the Minnesota Orchestra's complete season  >>