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Osmo Vänskä /// Music Director

Recent Articles: Featured

Musicians in the Spotlight

This season, six Minnesota Orchestra musicians take center stage as featured soloists! Take a moment to get to know each of them (including their favorite superheroes), then mark your calendar to hear their magnificent music at Orchestra Hall!

Upcoming Performances 

 

Vänskä Conducts Barber, Copland and Shaw

Featuring Gabriel Campos Zamora, clarinet

Jan 10-11 >>


 

Vänskä Conducts American Nomad

Featuring Charles Lazarus, trumpet

Jan 12-13 >>


 

Bizet, Mozart and Vivaldi

Featuring Roma Duncan, piccolo

Jan 31 - Feb 2 >>


 

Vänskä Conducts Beethoven and Sibelius

Featuring Tim Zavadil, bass clarinet

Apr 25-27 >>


 

Erin Keefe Plays Bernstein's Serenade

Featuring Erin Keefe, violin

May 3-4 >>

Osmo Vänskä Shares News

At the 2017-18 annual meeting, major news was shared on two fronts. We highlighted the artistic and financial milestones of the Orchestra’s 2017-18 season and Osmo Vänskä announced plans to conclude his tenure as Music Director of the Minnesota Orchestra in August 2022.

 

Osmo Vänskä Announces Plans to Conclude his Tenure 

Osmo Vänskä announced plans today at the Minnesota Orchestra’s annual meeting to conclude his tenure as Music Director of the Minnesota Orchestra in August 2022.

The 2021-22 season, his final as music director, will mark his 19th year at the helm of the Minnesota Orchestra, capping what is widely considered one of the great musical partnerships in Minnesota Orchestra history. Beyond 2022, Vänskä and the Minnesota Orchestra will maintain their musical relationship, with Vänskä returning for ongoing concert engagements.

Read more >>


 

Minnesota Orchestra Reports Fiscal 2018 Balanced Budget

The Minnesota Orchestra’s 2018 Annual Meeting celebrated the artistic and financial milestones of the Orchestra’s 2017-18 season, a year in which the Orchestra received a Grammy nomination and added to its Mahler symphony cycle; launched its first full-Orchestra Sensory-Friendly concert; toured to Mankato, Chicago, London and, in a first for a U.S. orchestra, South Africa—and achieved a balanced budget.

Read more >> 


Thank you to our audiences and donors for their wholehearted support which has made the achievements of the past season possible!

Three Memories

By Kevin Kling

One holiday Mary and I went to our niece's violin recital. Seven little girls in a row, ranging in ages from four to six, playing "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star". Almost immediately the bow of our niece got caught on one of the pigtails of the girl standing next to her. It would not pull free.

So she persevered, playing the entire piece with the head of the girl in pigtails whipping back and forth in time with the tune. Afterward, everyone agreed that our niece had a future in music.

As a collector of stories, I'm especially fond of the holidays. It's a heightened time when no matter the pre-planning or good intentions something always goes awry. As everyone knows these mishaps, mayhems and maladies make for the best stories.

We have one family story involving my grandparents. When they were newlyweds they asked the local preacher over for a holiday supper. This was during the time of Prohibition and my grandfather had recently made some homemade 'elixir' and it was in the basement in the process of 'getting good'. During the meal, some of the jars started to explode. Everyone, including the preacher, knew exactly what that sound meant. Without missing a beat my grandfather turned to my grandmother and said, "There going your peaches, Honey". "There go your peaches, Honey" is a catchphrase in my family ever since for when a situation has clearly gone off the rails.

One of my fondest memories falls in 1980. I was performing in England over the holidays and missing my family very much. To take my mind off of the homesickness I went to see a play called "The Dresser", starring Tom Courtenay and Albert Finney. It's about a friendship between two men and a ragtag group of performers in a London theater during World War II. The couple sitting next to me looked to be in their 80's and quite likely had served in the war or been subjected to the bombing raids that devastated London. As an air raid siren sounded in the play the man reached over and gripped my hand. When the bombs stopped he released, never looking over to me or acknowledging the gesture. Later on the entire audience sang together as the cast led us in "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square". Automatically everyone took hands and swayed back-and-forth. When the song ended, this time the man didn't let go of my hand and held it clear to the end of the play.


Hear more of Kevin's incredible stories at "Home for the Holidays" with the Minnesota Orchestra on Dec. 14, 16 & 20 >> 

Kevin Kling’s plays have been produced in the Twin Cities and around the world. His collaborations with composer Victor Zupanc include For the Birds for Zeitgeist, The Burning Wisdom of Finn McCool with the Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra and, most recently, The Best Summer Ever for the Children’s Theatre Company. A frequent commentator for TPT’s Almanac, NPR and MPR’s All Things Considered, Kling was named the Minneapolis Story Laureate by then-Mayor R.T. Rybak in 2014. He grew up in Osseo, Minnesota, and graduated from Gustavus Adolphus College. More: kevinkling.com.