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Osmo Vänskä /// Music Director

Special Offers: $20under40

The Minnesota Orchestra is pleased to offer $20 tickets for guests under the age of 40! This special offer is available for select concerts throughout the season, and more concerts are added monthly. See below for a list of eligible events.

20under40

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How to get your tickets online:

Simply choose a concert listed below and select “$20under40” for the ticket type when choosing your seats (top-priced seating sections not eligible). Tickets will be held at the Box Office and require one valid ID showing proof of age (must be 40 years or younger) per two tickets purchased. Order online or by phone for Will Call pickup only. Limit one pair of $20 tickets per eligible performance.

Eligible Concerts

About This Concert

Drawing on cosmic, Cubist and cultural influences, this concert is both nuanced and mesmerizing, featuring work by the gifted Syrian-American composer Kareem Roustom, as well as John Adams and the ever-inspiring Gustav Holst.

Program

*ROUSTOM
Ramal / 13 min

*ADAMS
Gnarly Buttons for Clarinet and Small Orchestra / 26 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

HOLST
The Planets / 48 min

Read more

Program notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Composer John Adams says the title of his work refers both to the “gnarly buttons” on trees, and the keys on a clarinet.
  • A fan of astrology, Holst based the narrative of The Planets in astrology, not astronomy, with each movement evoking the mythological characteristics of various planets.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra’s season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert:

In this concert wholly devoted to deserving young artists, we introduce composers on a blazing path to create the next generation’s orchestral masterpieces.

TJ COLE
Nightscape

VIET CUONG
Moxie

JONATHAN CZINER
Resonant Bells

WILL HEALY
Kolmanskop

MATTHEW RICKETTS
Melodia, for Piano and Orchestra

CONNOR ELIAS WAY
Over Collapsing Cities of Steel

ALYSSA WEINBERG
in somnis

This program is part of Minnesota Orchestra's American Expressions festival, celebrating and exploring this country’s bold, imaginative and diverse classical music tradition.

Fun Facts:

  • This concert is the final event of 16th Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute, co-presented with the American Composers Forum, a nationally recognized program to support young composers.
  • Composers spend one week in the Orchestra's award-winning professional training program, under the direction of Kevin Puts, winner of a 2012 Pulitzer Prize for his opera Silent Night.
  • In 2006 Osmo Vänskä expanded the Composer Institute to include a Future Classics concert showcasing music by the composers who attend the program. In addition to rehearsing and conducting the concert, he meets individually with all seven composers for private mentoring.
  • The Composer Institute grew out of the Orchestra's Perfect Pitch program, an annual series of new music reading sessions for Minnesota composers. Perfect Pitch was reformulated in 2001 as the Composer Institute.
  • This program’s works cover a range of musical styles; many will receive their first performance by a major American orchestra during the Future Classics concert.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Complete event details »

About This Concert:

Dive deeper into Stravinsky’s ballet Petrushka as host-violist Sam Bergman and conductor Sarah Hicks explore Stravinsky’s music through conversation and orchestral excerpts that illuminate the composer’s genius as a musical animator and puppet master of 20th-century music; after intermission, enjoy a full performance of Petrushka.

STRAVINSKY
Petrushka

Fun Facts:

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • Petrushka is known for its “Petrushka chord” made of two simple major chords that few composers before Stravinsky had ever tried putting together at once, due to their unusual clashing sound (C and F-sharp major). They represent the character of Petrushka, especially at the end of the piece, when two trumpets play the chords together to represent Petrushka’s ghost harassing the Charlatan.
  • Petrushka is a stock character in Russian folk puppetry, similar to England’s Punch (of Punch and Judy). Petrushkas can be either marionettes or hand puppets; they resemble a jester distinguished by his red dress and a red kolpak—a big furry hat.
  • Petrushka was a collaboration between composer Igor Stravinsky, scenery and costume designer Alexandre Benois, choreographer Mikhail Fokine and Ballets Russes impresario Serge Diaghilev.
  • Stravinsky said of his inspiration: “In composing the music, I had in my mind a distinct picture of a puppet, suddenly endowed with life, exasperating the patience of the orchestra with diabolical cascades of arpeggios. The orchestra in turn retaliates with menacing trumpet blasts.”
  • Petrushka was first performed by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris on June 13, 1911, with the role of Petrushka played by the legendary dancer Vaslav Nijinsky.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Complete event details »

About This Concert:

There’s no better way to celebrate the start of spring than with rush of beautiful music, including Libby Larsen’s poetically lush Symphony: Water Music, Schubert’s lyrical Unfinished Symphony and Strauss’ ode to Vienna’s majestic Danube River.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • David Danzmayr, conductor
  • Alina Ibragimova, violin

*LARSEN 
Symphony: Water Music  

SCHUMANN
Violin Concerto 

SCHUBERT
Symphony in B minor, Unfinished

J. STRAUSS, Jr.
On the Beautiful Blue Danube

Fun Facts:

  • In 1983, Larsen was one of the Minnesota Orchestra’s two composers-in-residence, making her the first woman to serve as a resident composer with a major American orchestra. She composed her first symphony, Water Music, for the Minnesota Orchestra, which premiered in 1985 under the direction of Sir Neville Marriner.
  • A chain of five interlinked waltz themes, Blue Danube is Austria’s unofficial national anthem and is played every New Year’s Day in Vienna.
  • Johann Strauss, Jr., made his U.S. debut at the World Peace Jubilee in Boston, where he conducted a 2,000-member orchestra in a performance of Blue Danube.
  • When Schubert died at age 31, he had composed more than 1,000 pieces of music. Like many young artists, he had to make the choice between music and a “serious” profession; fortunately for fans, he dropped out of law school.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Complete event details »

About This Concert:

Discover the genius of Amy Beach as conductor Sarah Hicks and host-violist Sam Bergman compare notes about the first American woman ever to compose a symphony, with the concert culminating in a complete performance of her Gaelic Symphony.

*BEACH
Gaelic Symphony

Fun Facts:

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • The Minnesota Orchestra will perform the 40-minute, four-movement Gaelic Symphony in its entirety after Sam Bergman and Sarah Hicks’ conversation.
  • Amy Beach, performing under the name “Mrs. H. H. A. Beach,” appeared with the Minnesota Orchestra, then known as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, on December 14, 1917. She was the featured soloist in her own Piano Concerto, and the Orchestra also performed her Gaelic Symphony.
  • A child prodigy, Amy Beach was born in New Hampshire to a prominent family. By age four, she was composing waltzes; at seven, she began giving public recitals; and at 17, she performed as a piano soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
  • Largely self-taught, Beach composed more than 150 works, including Mass in E-flat major, a violin sonata, a piano concerto and piano quintet, choral and chamber music and the opera Cahildo.
  • She was influenced by composer Antonín Dvořák, who believed that incorporating American folk tunes, Native American music and African American spirituals was key to establishing a uniquely American musical identity. Her own works drew on Irish and British traditional music and dances for inspiration.
  • Dvořák initially made disparaging comments about women’s ability to compose music, telling a newspaper “they have not the creative power.” Amy Beach refuted that in another newspaper, pointing out that “From the year 1675 to the year 1885, women have composed 153 works, including 55 serious operas, 6 cantatas, 53 comic operas, 17 operettas, 6 sing-spiele, 4 ballets, 4 vaudevilles, 2 oratorios, one each of fares, pastorales, masques, ballads and buffas,” and went on to list the names of dozens of female composers.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Complete event details »


Note: All seating subject to availability and may vary by performance. Normal service charges apply. Available while supplies last and may not be combined with any other offer. Tickets are non-exchangeable and non-refundable.

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