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Inside the Classics: Amy Beach - American Pioneer

About This Concert:

Discover the genius of Amy Beach as conductor Sarah Hicks and host-violist Sam Bergman compare notes about the first American woman ever to compose a symphony, with the concert culminating in a complete performance of her Gaelic Symphony.

*BEACH
Gaelic Symphony

Fun Facts:

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • The Minnesota Orchestra will perform the 40-minute, four-movement Gaelic Symphony in its entirety after Sam Bergman and Sarah Hicks’ conversation.
  • Amy Beach, performing under the name “Mrs. H. H. A. Beach,” appeared with the Minnesota Orchestra, then known as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, on December 14, 1917. She was the featured soloist in her own Piano Concerto, and the Orchestra also performed her Gaelic Symphony.
  • A child prodigy, Amy Beach was born in New Hampshire to a prominent family. By age four, she was composing waltzes; at seven, she began giving public recitals; and at 17, she performed as a piano soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
  • Largely self-taught, Beach composed more than 150 works, including Mass in E-flat major, a violin sonata, a piano concerto and piano quintet, choral and chamber music and the opera Cahildo.
  • She was influenced by composer Antonín Dvořák, who believed that incorporating American folk tunes, Native American music and African American spirituals was key to establishing a uniquely American musical identity. Her own works drew on Irish and British traditional music and dances for inspiration.
  • Dvořák initially made disparaging comments about women’s ability to compose music, telling a newspaper “they have not the creative power.” Amy Beach refuted that in another newspaper, pointing out that “From the year 1675 to the year 1885, women have composed 153 works, including 55 serious operas, 6 cantatas, 53 comic operas, 17 operettas, 6 sing-spiele, 4 ballets, 4 vaudevilles, 2 oratorios, one each of fares, pastorales, masques, ballads and buffas,” and went on to list the names of dozens of female composers.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Location Orchestra Hall
1111 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis
MN
55403
http://www.minnesotaorchestra.org

Returning and new subscribers get early access to all 2018-19 concerts. Subscription information » Tickets go on sale to the general public August 3.

Classical

Inside the Classics: Amy Beach - American Pioneer

Tickets

1531292574

1555203600

1563433374

Sat Apr 13 8pm

Amy Beach

Amy Beach

Returning and new subscribers get early access to all 2018-19 concerts. Subscription information » Tickets go on sale to the general public August 3.

About This Concert:

Discover the genius of Amy Beach as conductor Sarah Hicks and host-violist Sam Bergman compare notes about the first American woman ever to compose a symphony, with the concert culminating in a complete performance of her Gaelic Symphony.

*BEACH
Gaelic Symphony

Fun Facts:

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • The Minnesota Orchestra will perform the 40-minute, four-movement Gaelic Symphony in its entirety after Sam Bergman and Sarah Hicks’ conversation.
  • Amy Beach, performing under the name “Mrs. H. H. A. Beach,” appeared with the Minnesota Orchestra, then known as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, on December 14, 1917. She was the featured soloist in her own Piano Concerto, and the Orchestra also performed her Gaelic Symphony.
  • A child prodigy, Amy Beach was born in New Hampshire to a prominent family. By age four, she was composing waltzes; at seven, she began giving public recitals; and at 17, she performed as a piano soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
  • Largely self-taught, Beach composed more than 150 works, including Mass in E-flat major, a violin sonata, a piano concerto and piano quintet, choral and chamber music and the opera Cahildo.
  • She was influenced by composer Antonín Dvořák, who believed that incorporating American folk tunes, Native American music and African American spirituals was key to establishing a uniquely American musical identity. Her own works drew on Irish and British traditional music and dances for inspiration.
  • Dvořák initially made disparaging comments about women’s ability to compose music, telling a newspaper “they have not the creative power.” Amy Beach refuted that in another newspaper, pointing out that “From the year 1675 to the year 1885, women have composed 153 works, including 55 serious operas, 6 cantatas, 53 comic operas, 17 operettas, 6 sing-spiele, 4 ballets, 4 vaudevilles, 2 oratorios, one each of fares, pastorales, masques, ballads and buffas,” and went on to list the names of dozens of female composers.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.