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Events for January 15, 2019–June 15, 2019

About This Concert

In this concert wholly devoted to deserving young artists, we introduce composers on a blazing path to create the next generation’s orchestral masterpieces.

This program is part of Minnesota Orchestra's American Expressions festival, celebrating and exploring this country’s bold, imaginative and diverse classical music tradition.

Program

TJ COLE
Nightscape / 5 min

VIET CUONG
Moxie / 8 min

JONATHAN CZINER
Resonant Bells / 12 min

WILL HEALY
Kolmanskop / 10 min

MATTHEW RICKETTS
Melodia, for Piano and Orchestra / 16 min

CONNOR ELIAS WAY
Over Collapsing Cities of Steel / 10 min

ALYSSA WEINBERG
in somnis / 7 min

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Program Notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • This concert is the final event of 16th Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute, co-presented with the American Composers Forum, a nationally recognized program to support young composers.
  • This program’s works cover a range of musical styles; many will receive their first performance by a major American orchestra during the Future Classics concert.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert

In this concert wholly devoted to deserving young artists, we introduce composers on a blazing path to create the next generation’s orchestral masterpieces.

This concert, selected by our Student Ambassadors, features $12 student tickets and free extras in the lobby including a post-concert meet and greet with musicians. Activities start an hour and a half before the concert. More information coming soon!

Program

TJ COLE
Nightscape / 5 min

VIET CUONG
Moxie / 8 min

JONATHAN CZINER
Resonant Bells / 12 min

WILL HEALY
Kolmanskop / 10 min

MATTHEW RICKETTS
Melodia, for Piano and Orchestra / 16 min

CONNOR ELIAS WAY
Over Collapsing Cities of Steel / 10 min

ALYSSA WEINBERG
in somnis / 7 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • This concert is the final event of 16th Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute, co-presented with the American Composers Forum, a nationally recognized program to support young composers.
  • This program’s works cover a range of musical styles; many will receive their first performance by a major American orchestra during the Future Classics concert.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert

From the classical genius of Mozart to the flawless romanticism of Bizet, this concert features lush, intimate and sparkling works for small orchestra, perfectly calibrated by conductor Jane Glover in her Orchestra Hall debut.

Program

RAVEL
Le Tombeau de Couperin / 16 min

MOZART
Violin Concerto No. 5, Turkish / 31 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

VIVALDI
Piccolo Concerto in C major / 12 min

BIZET
Symphony No. 1  / 28 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Though performed here by our own Roma Duncan on piccolo, the Vivaldi concerto can be played on a recorder or flute. The flautino, the instrument originally specified by Vivaldi, was a Baroque instrument similar to a recorder.
  • While given the nickname Turkish for its Eastern-sounding influences, Mozart used Hungarian music as well as a ballet tune from one of his own operas for inspiration while composing this concerto.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Intimate, elegant and luminous, this one-hour concert is an invitation to mingle, and rejuvenate with music in gorgeous works by Ravel, Bizet and Vivaldi.

Program

RAVEL
Le Tombeau de Couperin / 16 min

VIVALDI
Piccolo Concerto in C major / 12 min

BIZET
Symphony No. 1  / 28 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Symphony in 60 concerts include a pre-show happy hour, local craft beer, and a chance to mingle with musicians post-performance.
  • Outspoken, opinionated and intelligent, Ravel was a brilliant critic and writer as well as a composer, and was a member of the artistic salon group known as “Les Apaches” (the Ruffians), which included the Spanish composer Manuel de Falla and poet Tristan Klingsor.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert

Intimate, elegant and luminous, this one-hour concert is an invitation to mingle, and rejuvenate with music in gorgeous works by Ravel, Bizet and Vivaldi.

This concert, selected by our Student Ambassadors, features $12 student tickets and free extras in the Student Zone (including yummy cookies from A Baker's Wife). Activities start an hour and a half before the concert. More information coming soon!

Program

RAVEL
Le Tombeau de Couperin / 16 min

VIVALDI
Piccolo Concerto in C major / 12 min

BIZET
Symphony No. 1  / 28 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Symphony in 60 concerts include a pre-show happy hour, local craft beer, and a chance to mingle with musicians post-performance.
  • Outspoken, opinionated and intelligent, Ravel was a brilliant critic and writer as well as a composer, and was a member of the artistic salon group known as “Les Apaches” (the Ruffians), which included the Spanish composer Manuel de Falla and poet Tristan Klingsor.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert

Beginning with the mysterious opening of Beethoven’s Fourth Piano Concerto and culminating with the heroic brass fanfare of Strauss’ tone poem, the Minnesota Orchestra illuminates the symphonic wizardry of these legendary composers.

Program

BEETHOVEN
Piano Concerto No. 4 / 34 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

STRAUSS
Ein Heldenleben (A Hero's Life) / 46 min

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Program Notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Beethoven’s prodigious rate of composition somewhat eclipsed this concerto, and he has Felix Mendelssohn to thank for popularizing it through performances at multiple concert halls across Europe.
  • Ein Heldenleben was initially viewed by critics as proof of Strauss’s artistic egotism, with its hero standing for the composer himself. Later critics believed the work to be a response to Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophies and their focus on the struggle between the inner and outer lives of the individual.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert:

Celebrate Valentine’s Day early at a Sunday afternoon chamber concert. A rare performance of Polish composer Grażyna Bacewicz’s Piano Quintet shines in between Mendelssohn’s romantic Piano Trio and Beethoven’s sparkling Septet.

MENDELSSOHN
Piano Trio in D minor

BACEWICZ
Piano Quintet No. 1

BEETHOVEN
Septet in E-flat major

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Fun Facts:

  • Pablo Casals, the great Spanish cellist, performed Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio at the White House after receiving an invitation from President John F. Kennedy in 1961.
  • Grażyna Bacewicz was one of the first female Polish composers to achieve international recognition.
  • Bacewicz was also a virtuoso violinist; she won numerous competitions and was the principal violinist of the Polish Radio Orchestra.
  • “A lot happens in my music,” said Bacewicz. “It’s aggressive and at the same time lyrical.”
  • Minnesota Orchestra musicians performed Beethoven’s Septet to a capacity crowd in a NightCap performance during the 2016 Beethoven Marathon at Orchestra Hall.
  • Haydn greatly approved of Beethoven’s new Septet, telling him it was “beautiful, nay, splendid.”

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

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About This Concert

Dive deeper into Stravinsky’s ballet Petrushka as host-violist Sam Bergman and conductor Sarah Hicks explore Stravinsky’s music through conversation and orchestral excerpts that illuminate the composer’s genius as a musical animator and puppet master of 20th-century music; after intermission, enjoy a full performance of Petrushka.

Program

Excerpts and conversation

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

STRAVINSKY
Petrushka / 34 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • Petrushka is known for its “Petrushka chord” made of two simple major chords that few composers before Stravinsky had ever tried putting together at once, due to their unusual clashing sound (C and F-sharp major). They represent the character of Petrushka, especially at the end of the piece, when two trumpets play the chords together to represent Petrushka’s ghost harassing the Charlatan.
  • Petrushka was first performed by Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris on June 13, 1911, with the role of Petrushka played by the legendary dancer Vaslav Nijinsky.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Renowned twin pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton sparkle in Mozart’s lyrical conversation between two pianos while former Minnesota Orchestra director Edo de Waart returns to the stage with a triumphant Respighi reprise.

Program

*BATES
Garages of the Valley  / 11 min

MOZART
Concerto No. 10 for Two Pianos and Orchestra  / 26 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

RESPIGHI
Church Windows / 25 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • This performance is a homecoming of sorts for Dutch conductor Edo de Waart. He was music director of the Minnesota Orchestra from 1986 to 1995.
  • Born in Princeton, NJ, Christina and Michelle are graduates of The Juilliard School and the Curtis Institute of Music. They are Steinway Artists who currently reside in New York City.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Join us for two can’t-miss guests as Moscow-born guest conductor Dima Slobodeniouk takes the stage for a graceful rendering of Prokofiev’s Seventh Symphony, and powerhouse cellist Johannes Moser performs Lutosławski’s concerto.

Program

PROKOFIEV
Suite from Love for Three Oranges / 15 min

LUTOSŁAWSKI
Cello Concerto / 23 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

PROKOFIEV
Symphony No. 7  / 31 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Prokofiev died at the age of 61, on March 5, 1953, the same day Stalin's death was made public. For three days, hordes of Stalin’s mourners made it impossible to transfer Prokofiev for burial.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Join us for the U.S. premiere of Mark-Anthony Turnage’s homage to composer Steve Martland, performed hypnotically by Colin Currie, and Missy Mazzoli’s darkly evocative work inspired by James Tate’s poem The Lost Pilot.

Program

*MAZZOLI
These Worlds in Us / 9 min

TURNAGE
Martland Memorial for Percussion and Orchestra [U.S. Premiere] / 20 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

*COPLAND
Symphony No. 3 / 38 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Composer Missy Mazzoli, called “Brooklyn's post-millennial Mozart” by Timeout New York, won the Best Opera of 2016 award from the Music Critics Association of North America for her work Breaking the Waves.
  • Given its U.S. premiere at these concerts, Martland Memorial is Mark-Anthony Turnage’s concerto-style musical tribute to his friend and fellow composer Steve Martland, and was composed especially to showcase the percussion genius of Colin Currie.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

There’s no better way to celebrate the start of spring than with rush of beautiful music, including Libby Larsen’s poetically lush Symphony: Water Music, Schubert’s lyrical Unfinished Symphony and Strauss’ ode to Vienna’s majestic Danube River.

Program

*LARSEN 
Symphony: Water Music / 17 min

SCHUMANN
Violin Concerto / 30 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

SCHUBERT
Symphony in B minor, Unfinished / 22 min

J. STRAUSS, Jr.
On the Beautiful Blue Danube / 10 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • In 1983, Larsen was one of the Minnesota Orchestra’s two composers-in-residence, making her the first woman to serve as a resident composer with a major American orchestra. She composed her first symphony, Water Music, for the Minnesota Orchestra, which premiered in 1985 under the direction of Sir Neville Marriner.
  • When Schubert died at age 31, he had composed more than 1,000 pieces of music. Like many young artists, he had to make the choice between music and a “serious” profession; fortunately for fans, he dropped out of law school.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Called “a sweet stream of melodies” when it premiered, Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony sparkles alongside Libby Larsen and Johann Strauss’ aquatically-themed selections in this cheerfully springy 60  minute musical interlude.

Program

*LARSEN 
Symphony: Water Music / 17 min

SCHUBERT
Symphony in B minor, Unfinished / 22 min

J. STRAUSS, Jr.
On the Beautiful Blue Danube / 10 min

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Program Notes PDF

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Symphony in 60 concerts include a pre-show happy hour, local craft beer, and a chance to mingle with musicians post-performance.
  • Scholars are still mystified as to why Schubert didn’t finish Symphony No. 8; some speculate that it was due to the onset of syphilis that would eventually kill him at age 31.
  • A passionate advocate for contemporary composers and their work, Libby Larsen co-founded the Minnesota Composers Forum, now the American Composers Forum, in 1973 to assist composers in a transitional time for American arts.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert

Called “a sweet stream of melodies” when it premiered, Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony sparkles alongside Libby Larsen and Johann Strauss’ aquatically-themed selections in this cheerfully springy 60  minute musical interlude.

This concert, selected by our Student Ambassadors, features free extras for students only in the Student Zone on the N. Bud Grossman Mezzanine. Includes:

  • Free cookies from A Baker's Wife
  • Win prizes by playing Orchestra Toss
  • Musical virtual reality game created by Glitch
  • Meet the musicians onstage after the concert

Program

*LARSEN 
Symphony: Water Music / 17 min

SCHUBERT
Symphony in B minor, Unfinished / 22 min

J. STRAUSS, Jr.
On the Beautiful Blue Danube / 10 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • Symphony in 60 concerts include a pre-show happy hour, local craft beer, and a chance to mingle with musicians post-performance.
  • Scholars are still mystified as to why Schubert didn’t finish Symphony No. 8; some speculate that it was due to the onset of syphilis that would eventually kill him at age 31.
  • A passionate advocate for contemporary composers and their work, Libby Larsen co-founded the Minnesota Composers Forum, now the American Composers Forum, in 1973 to assist composers in a transitional time for American arts.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Complete event details »

About This Concert

Join the Minnesota Orchestra for world-renowned British pianist Stephen Hough’s precisely attuned and poetic translation of Mendelssohn’s opulent concerto as well as guest conductor Han-Na Chang’s dynamic handling of Beethoven’s towering Eroica symphony.

Program

*SHEPHERD 
Silvery Rills / 4 min

MENDELSSOHN
Piano Concerto No. 1 / 20 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 3, Eroica / 51 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Hough was one of the youngest students at the Royal Northern College of Music before winning a scholarship to The Juilliard School.
  • The symphony was originally written in honor of Napoleon, who Beethoven believed to be a champion of freedom. When Napoleon crowned himself Emperor of France in 1804, Beethoven was disgusted and changed the name from "The Bonaparte Symphony" to "Eroica."

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

We introduce a bright new talent in these concerts. Ilyich Rivas made his professional conducting debut at just 16. Now in his mid-20s, the dynamic Venezuelan-American conductor has been described by The Guardian as a “phenomenon” who is “strikingly, almost disconcertingly good.” Hear for yourself what the excitement is about as Rivas makes his Minnesota Orchestra debut leading Dvořák’s bucolic Eighth Symphony and Ginastera’s colorful Ballet Suite. Dazzling American violinist Stefan Jackiw completes the program performing a masterwork: Mendelssohn’s beloved Violin Concerto.

Program

GINASTERA 
Ballet Suite from Estancia / 12 min

MENDELSSOHN 
Violin Concerto / 27 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

Dvořák 
Symphony No. 8 / 36 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Born in 1985, Stefan Jackiw made his European debut at age 14, playing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, the same work he’ll play on our program. That debut performance was featured on the front page of London’s Times and The Strad reported, “A 14-year-old violinist took the London music world by storm.”
  • Rivas has previously held positions with the London Philharmonic (Assistant Conductor) and Baltimore Symphony (BSO/Peabody Institute Conducting fellow). In 2011 he traveled to Australia at the invitation of Michael Tilson Thomas to conduct the YouTube Symphony Orchestra at the Sydney Opera House.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

Discover the genius of Amy Beach as conductor Sarah Hicks and host-violist Sam Bergman compare notes about the first American woman ever to compose a symphony, with the concert culminating in a complete performance of her Gaelic Symphony.

Program

Excerpts and conversation

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

*BEACH
Gaelic Symphony / 40 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • Amy Beach, performing under the name “Mrs. H. H. A. Beach,” appeared with the Minnesota Orchestra, then known as the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, on December 14, 1917. She was the featured soloist in her own Piano Concerto, and the Orchestra also performed her Gaelic Symphony.
  • A child prodigy, Amy Beach was born in New Hampshire to a prominent family. By age four, she was composing waltzes; at seven, she began giving public recitals; and at 17, she performed as a piano soloist with the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Nordic forest spirits meet Greek gods in a performance that combines ethereal expressiveness with glittering Romanticism as Vänskä conducts Tómasson, Siblelius, Beethoven, and the U.S. premiere of composer Geoffrey Gordon’s Prometheus.

Program

BEETHOVEN
Overture to The Creatures of Prometheus / 5 min

*GORDON
Prometheus [U.S. Premiere] / 24 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

TÓMASSON
Piano Concerto No. 2 / 16 min

SIBELIUS
Tapiola / 19 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • In the Romantic era during which Beethoven composed, Prometheus was viewed as symbol of lone genius whose attempts to improve human existence could lead to tragedy, as reflected in the sub-title for Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: A Modern Prometheus.
  • Tapiola was Sibelius's last major work, a tone poem, inspired by the wanderings of a forest spirit in the The Kalevala, a nineteenth century epic poem based on Finnish folklore and mythology.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert:

The Target Atrium becomes a woodwind’s paradise as Principal Clarinet Gabriel Campos Zamora performs the piece that brought Brahms out of retirement, and Principal Oboe John Snow and Principal Bassoon Fei Xie bring Poulenc’s trio to witty and graceful life. Snow is also joined by four string players to perform a movement from Bach’s Cantata No. 156. [Please note program change: the Bach Sinfonia replaces the work originally scheduled to open the concert, Neal Desby’s Aria for English Horn and String Quartet.]

BACH
Sinfonia for Oboe and String Quartet, from Cantata No. 156

POULENC
Trio for Oboe, Bassoon and Piano

BRAHMS
Quintet for Clarinet and Strings

Fun Facts:

  • Brahms came out of retirement specifically to write the Clarinet Quintet (and a few additional pieces) for Richard Mühlfield, a German clarinetist whose performances had greatly inspired him.
  • Brahms’ Clarinet Quintet has been played several times on the Orchestra’s Chamber Music series, each time with Music Director Osmo Vänskä performing the clarinet part. This performance features one of the Orchestra’s newest musicians, Principal Clarinet Gabriel Campos Zamora.

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Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

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About This Concert

Immerse yourself in beauty of Leonard Bernstein’s mercurial Serenade, performed spectacularly by virtuoso violinist Jennifer Koh, as well as stormily passionate minor-key symphonies from two towering classical composers who Bernstein cherished and championed.

Program

HAYDN
Symphony No. 44, Mourning Symphony / 22 min

*BERNSTEIN
Serenade, after Plato's "Symposium" / 30 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

*BERNSTEIN
Divertimento / 15 min

MOZART
Symphony No. 40 / 22 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Leonard Bernstein composed Divertimento for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's centenary, and also in honor of Boston itself, as he was graduate of Harvard University and The Boston Latin School. The piece is a series based on two notes, B for Boston and C for Centennial.
  • Plato's Symposium was inspired, according to Bernstein, by ancient dialogues about the nature of love, though scholars now speculate it was also a coded reference to Bernstein's own homosexuality.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Fusing operatic drama, gorgeous solo moments and symphonic prowess, Verdi’s Requiem is a transcendent musical rollercoaster well suited to the gift of Edward Gardner, a renowned conductor of symphonies and operas worldwide.

Program

VERDI
Requiem / 83 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • Verdi's Requiem Mass was first performed in the Milan Cathedral on May 22, 1874. He composed it to honor a famous novelist and poet Alessandro Manzoni, who died the previous year.
  • A student at Eton, Cambridge, and the Royal Academy of Music, Gardner was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2012 Birthday Honours for services to music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert

A pair of symphonic poems, an audacious piano concerto, and a folkloric work by Polish composer Witold Lutosławski combine to create the perfect musical menu for late spring: lush, impressionistic and shimmering.

Program

BORISOVA-OLLAS 
The Kingdom of Silence  / 15 min

*GERSHWIN
Piano Concerto in F / 29 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

DEBUSSY
Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun / 10 min

LUTOSŁAWSKI
Concerto for Orchestra / 26 min

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Artists

Fun Facts

  • The Baltimore Sun proclaims “Borisova-Ollas’ The Kingdom of Silence is beautifully structured…it begins and ends with exquisite subtleties.”
  • A performance of the Gershwin Concerto’s third movement appears in a humorous fantasy sequence in the film An American in Paris (1951).

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

For much of musical history, LGBT musicians and composers were marginalized and censored, even as they permanently transformed the landscape of classical music. In this concert, we celebrate the talent and legacy of composers who ignored convention and created lasting masterpieces.

Program

*BARBER
Overture to The School for Scandal / 8 min

*COPLAND
Saturday Night Waltz, from Rodeo / 4 min

POULENC
Allegro con fuoco, mvt. I from Sinfonietta / 5 min

*STRAYHORN
Lush Life / 3 min

*OLIVEROS
Dissolving Your Earplugs / 6 min

*HIGDON
blue cathedral / 11 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

TCHAIKOVSKY
Andante non troppo, mvt. I from Serenade for Strings / 9 min

MORLEY
Suite from Watership Down

DIAMOND
Music for Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, II: Balcony Scene / 4 min

*BERNSTEIN
Lonely Town (Pas de Deux), from On the Town Suite / 3 min

DAVIES
An Orkney Wedding, with Sunrise / 13 min

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Program Notes PDF

Artists

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Sarah Hicks, conductor
  • Sam Bergman, host and viola
  • Debbie Duncan, vocalist
  • Mary Louise Knutson, piano

Fun Facts

  • Inside the Classics features a pre-concert happy hour, local craft brews, and a chance to mingle with musicians onstage after the performance.
  • Inside the Classics, now in its ninth season, features Minnesota Orchestra violist and host Sam Bergman and conductor Sarah Hicks. The duo explore classical music through conversation and orchestral excerpts. This Inside the Classics concert is part of the Minnesota Orchestra's Casual Concerts series.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

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About This Concert:

Unique perspectives and creative motivations—including poetry, dance, jazz, opera and tragedy—helped to inspire these four chamber pieces from throughout the 20th century.

WALTON
Suite from Façade

BARTÓK
Contrasts

STRAUSS
Sextet from Capriccio

SHOSTAKOVICH
String Quartet No. 8

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Program Notes PDF

Fun Facts:

  • The premiere of Façade featured the poet, Edith Sitwell, reciting her work through a megaphone, while the composer conducted the original six-player ensemble.
  • Bartók joined Benny Goodman and Joseph Szigeti onstage as the pianist to complete the ensemble for its premiere.
  • The original suggestion from violinist Joseph Szigeti was for Bartók to create a two-movement piece that was short enough to fit on a 78 rpm record.
  • Shostakovich composed his String Quartet No. 8 in three days.
  • Several times throughout his Eighth Quartet, Shostakovich includes the famous DSCH motive, created from the letters in his own name.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

Layering expressive understanding with elegant technique, American conductor Kent Nagano and Austrian pianist Till Fellner shine in this concert of Mozart and Bruckner that truly reveals the range of their luminous talents.

Program

MOZART
Piano Concerto No. 20  / 28 min

—INTERMISSION 20 MINUTES—

BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 6 / 54 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • A late bloomer, Anton Bruckner only began composing music at age 37.
  • The Chicago Classical Review praises Fellner’s “easy fluency,” “pearly tone” and “singing way with a phrase.”

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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About This Concert

By turns turbulent, calm and ecstatic, Mahler’s Tenth Symphony evokes both despair and hope, and Osmo Vänskä skillfully teases out the extremes to revel in their emotional depth for the sweeping season finale.

Program

MAHLER/Cooke
Symphony No. 10 / 80 min

Artists

Fun Facts

  • In his lifetime, Mahler was better known as a conductor rather than a composer and is considered to be one of the most passionate and greatest conductors in music history.
  • A Post-Romantic period composer, Mahler’s work foreshadowed the progressive tonality of the 20th century.

Accessibility at Orchestra Hall

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

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