Your presale validation code has been accepted.
Click the
BUY
button to order your tickets.

Osmo Vänskä /// Music Director

Saturday Evening Vivace Series


/

Season Opening: Osmo Vänskä and Emanuel Ax

About This Concert:

The first concert of the season showcases the vibrant talent of composers Aaron Copland and Joan Tower and pianist virtuoso Emanuel Ax in a celebration of American innovation, originality and creative vision.

*TOWER
Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman

*COPLAND
Appalachian Spring

BRAHMS
Piano Concerto No. 2

Fun Facts:

  • Tower’s Fanfare, a tribute to risk-taking, adventurous women everywhere, has been performed worldwide by over 500 ensembles.
  • In 2008, Tower's Made in America won three Grammys: Best Orchestral Performance, Best Classical Album and best Classical Contemporary Composition.
  • A trailblazer in the world of female American composers and conductors, Joan Tower began her musical career in the 1960’s and went on to become, in the words of the New Yorker, "one of the most successful woman composers of all time.”
  • Ax has received Grammys for two volumes of his cycle of Haydn piano sonatas, and for his recordings of Beethoven and Brahms sonatas with cellist Yo-Yo Ma.
  • Appalachian Spring is part of a trilogy of dance interpretations of the American frontier spirit that also includes Billy the Kid (1938) and Rodeo (1942).
  • Echoing the “high lonesome” bluegrass sound popular at the time, Copland’s open chords and minimal textures used traditional American music as an inspiration.
  • Created as the score for a ballet by the legendary Martha Graham, Appalachian Spring takes its title from a poem by modernist American poet Hart Crane.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra’s season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Sat Sep 22 8pm

/

Celebrating Northrop's Restored Pipe Organ

About This Concert:

Celebrate the restoration of Northrop’s prized organ with music of contemporary composer John Harbison and Saint-Saëns that showcases its rich sound and tremendous resonance.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Osmo Vänskä, conductor
  • Paul Jacobs, organ

BACH/Hubay
Chaconne from Partita No. 2

*HARBISON
What Do We Make of Bach? for Orchestra and Obbligato Organ [World Premiere]

SAINT SAËNS
Symphony No. 3, Organ Symphony

Please note: This concert will be performed at Northrop at the University of Minnesota.

Fun Facts:

  • This concert is presented in collaboration with Northrop, University of Minnesota.
  • With 7068 pipes that vary from straw-sized to 32 feet, the organ takes up a space roughly equal to the width of Northrop's stage.
  • In 1999, the Organ Historical Society named Northrop’s organ an “exceptional historic merit worth of preservation.”
  • Harbison, the Minnesota Orchestra’s 2018-19 Featured Composer, is celebrating his 80th birthday in 2018.
  • In 1998, John Harbison won the Heinz Award for the Arts and Humanities. He has also received a Kennedy Center Friedheim First Prize for his Piano Concerto as well as a MacArthur Fellowship.
  • A rockstar of the organ world, Paul Jacobs played Bach’s complete organ works in an 18-hour marathon performance on the 250th anniversary of the composer’s death.
  • Saint-Saëns’ beloved Organ Symphony was the third and final of his symphonies.
  • Historians speculate that Bach composed the Chaconne between 1718 and 1720, after returning from a trip to find his wife Maria Barbara had died.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra’s season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Sat Oct 13 8pm

/

Guarantors' Week: Anthony Ross Plays Shostakovich

About This Concert:

Kinetically joyful, Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony represents the composer at the height of his powers, while Kevin Puts' contemporary work Imagining Beethoven brings new depth to Beethoven's creative process.

During the second week of November, the Minnesota Orchestra will celebrate its 7,000+ Guaranty Fund donors. This week's concert performances will be dedicated to all whose generous contributions ensure that the Minnesota Orchestra can continue to bring incredible music experiences to our community. Ticket sales only cover a quarter of the Orchestra's annual budget; therefore, donor support is absolutely critical. To all of our donors: thank you for making this exciting season of music possible!

Not yet a Guaranty Fund donor? Become a donor and support the music you love »

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Brett Mitchell, conductor
  • Anthony Ross, cello

*PUTS
Inspiring Beethoven

SHOSTAKOVICH
Cello Concerto No. 2

BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 7

Fun Facts:

  • The second movement of the Shostakovich concerto is built on a popular 1920s street song from Odessa that he loved, "Bubliki, kupite bubliki" loosely translated as “Pretzels, buy my pretzels.”
  • Shostakovich composed his Second Cello Concerto in the spring of 1966. It was first performed September 25, 1966 of that year, at a 60th birthday party for the composer.
  • The Allegretto from Symphony No. 7 is heard as George VI delivers his first wartime speech in the Oscar-winning movie The King’s Speech.
  • Symphony No. 7 premiered in Vienna on December 8, 1813, at a charity concert for soldiers wounded in the Battle of Hanau between Austro-Bavarian troops and Napoleon’s army.
  • Principal Cello Anthony Ross joined the Minnesota Orchestra in 1988 and became principal cello in 1991. He was an award-winner in the prestigious Tchaikovsky Competition, and a recipient of two McKnight Fellowships.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra’s season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Sat Nov 17 8pm

/

Prokofiev's Symphony No. 7

About This Concert:

Join us for two can’t-miss guests as Moscow-born guest conductor Dima Slobodeniouk takes the stage for a graceful rendering of Prokofiev’s Seventh Symphony, and powerhouse cellist Johannes Moser performs folkloric Lutosławski’s concerto.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Dima Slobodeniouk, conductor
  • Johannes Moser, cello

PROKOFIEV
Suite from Love for Three Oranges

LUTOSŁAWSKI
The Cello Concerto

PROKOFIEV
Symphony No. 7 

Fun Facts:

  • Commissioned in 1954 for the nascent Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, Lutosławski’s concerto draws on Oskar Kolberg's five-volume Mazowsze collection of Polish folk music from the Mazovian region for inspiration.
  • La Opinion applauds Slobodeniouk’s “exceptional sensitivity,” while BBC Music Magazine gives him “full marks…for putting across all this music with such power, intelligence, and refinement.”
  • Prokofiev died at the age of 61, on March 5, 1953, the same day Stalin's death was made public. For three days, hordes of Stalin’s mourners made it impossible to transfer Prokofiev for burial.
  • Johannes Moser is “one of the finest among the astonishing gallery of young virtuoso cellists” according to Gramophone magazine, and Mercury News cheers his “rare technical clarity and directness of expression.”

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Sat Mar 2 8pm

/

Stephen Hough Plays Mendelssohn

About This Concert:

Join the Minnesota Orchestra for world-renowned British pianist Stephen Hough’s precisely attuned and poetic translation of Mendelssohn’s opulent concerto as well as guest conductor Han-Na Chang’s dynamic handling of Beethoven’s towering Eroica symphony.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Han-Na Chang, conductor
  • Stephen Hough, piano

*SHEPHERD 
Silvery Rills

MENDELSSOHN
Piano Concerto No. 1 

BEETHOVEN
Symphony No. 3, Eroica

Fun Facts:

  • The symphony was originally written in honor of Napoleon, who Beethoven believed to a champion of freedom. When Napoleon crowned himself Emperor of France in 1804, Beethoven was disgusted and changed the name from "The Bonaparte Symphony" to "Eroica."
  • The Eroica premiered in Vienna on April 7, 1805, and was grander in scale than most symphonies at the time. It was Beethoven’s largest solely instrumental work.
  • Ambitious in both its scope and its emotional impact, Eroica shattered conventional audience expectations that music was mere entertainment, containing no larger message or mission.
  • The St. Louis Post Dispatch calls Han-Na Chang “one of the most exciting conductors to take the podium” and praised her “inspired control.”
  • Hough discovered his affinity for piano when he selected more than one hundred nursery rhymes on his aunt’s piano. He went on to become one of the youngest students at the Royal Northern College of Music before winning a scholarship to The Juilliard School.
  • Hough rocks: When he was a guest on BBC Radio 4's cult hit Desert Island Discs program, he chose Led Zeppelin’s Stairway to Heaven as one of his musical selections.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Sat Apr 6 8pm

/

Season Finale: Vänskä Conducts Mahler's Tenth

About This Concert:

By turns turbulent, calm, and ecstatic, Mahler’s Tenth Symphony evokes both despair and hope and Osmo Vänskä skillfully teases out the extremes to revel in their emotional depth for the sweeping season finale.

MAHLER/Cooke
Symphony No. 10

Fun Facts:

  • In his lifetime, Mahler was better known as a conductor rather than a composer and is considered to be one of the most passionate and greatest conductors in music history.
  • Entranced by Austrian military and folk music he grew up hearing, Mahler started rearranging and composing music on the accordion and piano.
  • Born a Jew, Mahler experienced racial discrimination in his youth and converted to Catholicism in 1897 to land a job at the Vienna State Opera, which would not hire Jews.
  • During WWII Nazi Germany banned famous Jewish conductors Otto Klemperer and Bruno Walter, who were known for their interpretations of Mahler’s work.
  • A Post-Romantic period composer, Mahler’s work foreshadowed the progressive tonality of the 20th century.
  • Music Director Osmo Vänskä and the Minnesota Orchestra’s newest major recording project of Mahler symphonies began with Mahler’s Fifth Symphony—which was nominated for a 2018 Grammy® Award.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Sat Jun 15 8pm