Your presale validation code has been accepted.
Click the
BUY
button to order your tickets.

Osmo Vänskä /// Music Director

Friday Evening Bravo Series


/

Vänskä Conducts The Planets

About This Concert:

Drawing on cosmic, Cubist and cultural influences, this concert is both nuanced and mesmerizing, featuring work by the gifted Syrian-American composer Kareem Roustom, as well as John Adams and the ever-inspiring Gustav Holst.

*ROUSTOM
Ramal

*ADAMS
Gnarly Buttons for Clarinet and Small Orchestra

HOLST
The Planets

Fun Facts:

  • Roustom’s Ramal, commissioned by Daniel Barenboim for the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, was described by The New York Times as “propulsive, colorful and [an] immediately appealing creation.”
  • The Guardian praises Ramal as “arrestingly quirky and postmodern…music with lots of personality” and the Chicago Tribune has described Roustom as “a gifted and accomplished artist…one of the most prominent active Arab-American composers.”
  • Composer John Adams says the title of his work refers both to the “gnarly buttons” on trees, and the keys on a clarinet.
  • A fan of astrology, Holst based the narrative of The Planets in astrology, not astronomy, with each movement evoking the mythological characteristics of various planets.
  • Award-winning composer John Williams used rhythms and harmonies from the Mars movement as an inspiration for the soundtrack of Star Wars.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra’s season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Fri Sep 28 8pm

/

Rouvali and Shaham

About This Concert:

Acclaimed violinist Gil Shaham meets up with guest conductor Santtu-Matias Rouvali of the Gothenburg Symphony for a virtuoso take on Prokofiev’s dazzling First Concerto, followed by Brahms’ grandly imposing First Symphony.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Santtu-Matias Rouvali, conductor
  • Gil Shaham, violin

STRAUSS
Suite from Der Rosenkavalier

PROKOFIEV
Violin Concerto No. 1

BRAHMS
Symphony No. 1

Fun Facts:

  • According to The Los Angeles Times, “Rouvali’s imaginative, often spectacular musicality is exceptional,” while the Times (U.K.) anoints him “the real thing.”
  • Gil Shaham received the prestigious Avery Fisher Prize in 2008, and was named “Instrumentalist of the Year” by Musical America in 2012, which cited the “special kind of humanism” with which he performs.
  • A child prodigy, Prokofiev composed his first piano piece when he was 5 and his first opera at age 9. His friend and fellow composer Igor Stravinsky described Prokofiev as the greatest Russian composer of his day. (After himself, of course.)
  • The winner of multiple Grammys, a Grand Prix du Disque, Diapason d’Or and Gramophone Editor’s Choice award, Shaham plays the 1699 “Countess Polignac” Stradivarius.
  • With its dissonance, double and triple stops and fast pizzicato, Prokofiev’s First Violin Concerto is the perfect piece for virtuoso violinists to showcase their talents.
  • The Guardian says Shaham’s playing evokes “eloquence and powerful expressivity,” and the Sydney Morning Herald praises his “ability to shape phrases with smiling warmth.”

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Fri Oct 19 8pm

/

Vänskä Conducts Barber, Copland and Shaw

About This Concert:

Experience the lyric beauty of Copland, Hanson, Shaw and Barber as the Minnesota Orchestra and Principal Clarinet Gabriel Campos Zamora explore the wild spirit and individualism of composers at the forefront of 20th century American music.

*BARBER
Symphony No. 1

*COPLAND
Clarinet Concerto

*SHAW
Clarinet Concerto

*HANSON
Symphony No. 2, Romantic

This program is part of Minnesota Orchestra's American Expressions festival, celebrating and exploring this country’s bold, imaginative and diverse classical music tradition.

Fun Facts:

  • Copland first knew he wanted to be a composer at age 15, so he began studying harmony, theory and composition with Rubin Goldmark, a teacher and composer who had briefly taught George Gershwin.
  • Copland influenced successive generations of composers, teaching and inspiring students such as Leonard Bernstein, Alberto Ginastera, Alvin Lucier, and Michael Tilson Thomas.
  • President Lyndon Johnson awarded Copland the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1964. In 1986, he earned the National Medal of Arts; in 1987 the United States Congress presented him with a special Congressional Gold Medal.
  • Composer Artie Shaw and his orchestra performed his concerto for clarinet in the Fred Astaire film Second Chorus, a biopic of Shaw’s life.
  • Samuel Barber’s last opera was Antony and Cleopatra (1966), a collaboration with filmmaker Franco Zeffirelli. It was a critical flop that had lasting staying power, thanks in part to Leontyne Price’s fabulous arias.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Fri Jan 11 8pm

/

Mozart's Double Piano Concerto

About This Concert:

Renowned twin pianists Christina and Michelle Naughton sparkle in Mozart’s lyrical conversation between two pianos while former Minnesota Orchestra director Edo de Waart returns to the stage with a triumphant Respighi reprise.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Edo de Waart, conductor
  • Christina Naughton, piano
  • Michelle Naughton, piano

*BATES
Garages of the Valley 

MOZART
Concerto No. 10 for Two Pianos and Orchestra 

RESPIGHI
Church Windows

Fun Facts:

  • This performance is a homecoming of sorts for Dutch conductor Edo de Waart. He was music director of the Minnesota Orchestra from 1986 to 1995.
  • 30-year old composer Mason Bates was inspired by the garages of Silicon Valley that served as incubators for some of the most successful tech businesses of the Digital Age.
  • According to Revue, “The Naughton twins bring esoteric unity to their art form in a way only identical twins can.”
  • The San Francisco Examiner celebrates the Naughtons for their “stellar musicianship, technical mastery, and awe-inspiring artistry.”
  • Born in Princeton, NJ, Christina and Michelle are graduates of The Juilliard School and the Curtis Institute of Music. They are Steinway Artists who currently reside in New York City.
  • Mozart’s concerto was originally scored for the two pianos together with two oboes, two bassoons; two horns; and strings; he later expanded the score with pairs of clarinets, trumpets and timpani in E flat and B flat.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Fri Feb 22 8pm

/

Erin Keefe Plays Bernstein's Serenade

About This Concert:

Immerse yourself in beauty of Leonard Bernstein’s mercurial Serenade, performed spectacularly by Concertmaster Erin Keefe, as well as stormily passionate minor-key symphonies from two towering classical composers who Bernstein cherished and championed.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Juanjo Mena, conductor
  • Erin Keefe, violin

HAYDN
Symphony No. 44 Mourning Symphony

*BERNSTEIN
Serenade, after Plato's "Symposium"
Divertimento

MOZART
Symphony No 40

Fun Facts:

  • Leonard Bernstein composed Divertimento for the Boston Symphony Orchestra's centenary, and also in honor of Boston itself, as he was graduate of Harvard University and The Boston Latin School. The piece is a series based on two notes, B for Boston and C for Centennial.
  • A frequent soloist with national and international symphonies, Erin Keefe earned degrees from The Curtis Institute for Music and Julliard. She performs on a Nicolo Gagliano violin made in 1732.
  • Haydn wrote his Symphony No. 44 around 1770, during a musical era known as “Sturm und Drang” that was inspired by Rousseau’s Enlightenment philosophies emphasizing heightened emotional expressiveness.
  • While nicknamed the Trauer or Mourning Symphony, the piece is not intended to be especially sad. Hayden simply wanted it to be played at his funeral.
  • Plato's Symposium was inspired, according to Bernstein, by ancient dialogues about the nature of love, though scholars now speculate it was also a coded reference to Bernstein's own homosexuality.

*This work is part of Minnesota Orchestra's season-long exploration and celebration of American music. Learn more about our American Expressions festival in January 2019.

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Fri May 3 8pm

/

Nagano Conducts Bruckner

About This Concert:

Layering expressive understanding with elegant technique, both Montreal Symphony music director Kent Nagano and Austrian pianist Till Fellner shine in this concert of Mozart and Bruckner that truly reveals the range of their luminous talents.

  • Minnesota Orchestra
  • Kent Nagano, conductor
  • Till Fellner, piano

MOZART
Piano Concerto No. 20 

BRUCKNER
Symphony No. 6

Fun Facts:

  • The Chicago Classical Review praises Fellner’s “easy fluency,” “pearly tone” and “singing way with a phrase.”
  • The Los Angeles Times lauds Kent Nagano as “one of world's most imaginative and important conductors” and praises his ability to take an orchestra to “ethereal realms.”
  • A late bloomer, Anton Bruckner only began composing music at age 37.
  • During his lifetime, Anton Bruckner was well-known for his organ playing; when he died he was buried, according to his wishes, in the vault underneath his beloved organ at St Florian in Linz.
  • The Chicago Tribune applauds Fellner’s brilliant style, including his “sparkling runs, pearly tone and diamond-edged articulation.”
  • Frank Zappa personally chose Nagano to conduct the London Symphony Orchestra for his recording called London Symphony Orchestra, Vol. 1  that included "Sad Jane," "Pedro's Dowry," "Envelopes," and "Mo 'n Herb's Vacation.”

Accessibility

Assisted listening devices available Large print program available Wheelchair seating availableService dogs welcomePlease refrain from using strong perfumes and colognes

Read more about Accessibility at Orchestra Hall.

Fri Jun 7 8pm