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Osmo Vänskä /// Music Director

Special Offers: MERSC

As a member organization of MERSC (Minnesota Employee Recreation & Services Council), the Minnesota Orchestra is pleased to offer 50% off select concerts to other MERSC members and their employees. Promo codes are emailed on a monthly basis to MERSC representatives. Check with your organization to receive the discount code.

How to get your tickets online:

Simply choose a concert listed below and enter the promo code from our monthly email before selecting your seats to have the discount automatically applied to your order. Choose your seats using the 50% off price type.

Eligible Concerts

About This Concert:

A huge success at its 1930s premiere and beloved by orchestras and choirs since, Belshazzar’s Feast tells the ancient Hebrew story of lamentation and liberation.

BERNSTEIN
Fancy Free
Chichester Psalms

WALTON
Belshazzar's Feast

Read program notes »

Fun Facts:

  • Leonard Bernstein, linked so strongly to Manhattan by his Broadway successes and his years leading the New York Philharmonic, was born 100 years ago—outside Boston.
  • Bernstein’s Fancy Free is a ballet set in WWII-era New York, the comic story of three sailors on leave and looking for love.
  • Belshazzar’s Feast sets Hebrew scripture about the overthrow of Babylonia’s King Belshazzar to sweeping music.
  • The British Broadcasting Corporation commissioned Walton in 1929 to create a “small-scale” choral work, but instead he wrote Belshazzar’s Feast for a chorus and orchestra so large they couldn’t fit into BBC studios.
  • Sir Thomas Beecham conducted the premiere, and as he saw the work-in-progress getting larger and larger he said, “My dear boy, because no one will ever hear this piece again, why not throw in a couple of brass bands?”
  • After the huge success of its 1931 premiere, Belshazzar’s Feast became one of the most popular oratorios of the 20th century.
  • Since his last performance at Orchestra Hall in 2008, Christopher Maltman returns with the Minnesota Chorale.

It takes a larger-than-life talent to bring William Walton’s sweeping oratorio Belshazzar’s Feast to life, and Andrew Litton is just that talent–with a Grammy-winning® recording to prove it. Litton joins us in spring to lead this inspirational setting from the Hebrew scriptures about the liberation of the Jewish people.

Complete event details »

About This Concert:

Augustin Hadelich brings his crystalline tone to Beethoven’s Violin Concerto, then Orchestra Hall lights up with Berlioz’s brilliant Symphonie fantastique.

BEETHOVEN
Violin Concerto

BERLIOZ
Symphonie fantastique

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Fun Facts:

  • Is it too easy or too hard? The Beethoven Concerto isn’t every violinist’s cup of tea because the emphasis here is on lyricism and elegance, not technical fireworks.
  • When Hadelich was a boy, he suffered severe burns and couldn’t play violin for a year. He said, “Because I had this moment where I wasn’t sure if I would ever play the violin again, I appreciate my life more. It made me realize how important music was to me.”
  • Berlioz wrote his Symphonie fantastique when he was only 27 (and most likely experimenting with opium).
  • Leonard Bernstein said, “Berlioz tells it like it is. You take a trip, you wind up screaming at your own funeral.”
  • The fifth movement of Symphonie fantastique contains the iconic funeral chant, the Dies Irae.

Complete event details »

About This Concert:

The luminous soprano Carolyn Sampson joins us to perform Mahler’s Fourth—a quiet version of heaven where a child’s every dream comes true.

STEPHENSON
Pillars, a Concerto for Low Brass [World Premiere]

MAHLER
Symphony No. 4

Read program notes »

Fun Facts:

  • One of the powerful foundations of our Orchestra is our rockstar low-brass section; Hidden in plain sight, these four gents are the best in the biz!
  • Strauss’ contemporary Gustav Mahler wrote encouragingly for the brass in almost all of his 10 symphonies, giving glorious fanfares to them—though in his tender Symphony No. 4, Mahler gave pride of place to the strings and a solo soprano.
  • The soprano in Mahler’s Fourth sings every exasperated parent’s dinnertime fantasy, as a child describes “good greens of every sort grow in the heavenly vegetable patch, good asparagus, string beans, and whatever we want!”
  • James Stephenson’s low brass concerto Pillars is the first piece the Minnesota Orchestra has ever premiered that started as a Kickstarter campaign. 149 friends of former Charleston Symphony principal trombonist Bill Zehfuss used Kickstarter to fund the commission honoring Bill after his death in 2014.

Complete event details »


Note: All seating subject to availability and may vary by performance. Normal service charges apply. Available while supplies last and may not be combined with any other offer. Tickets are non-exchangeable and non-refundable. Top-priced seating sections not eligible.