List view
Calendar view
Events tagged with Chamber & NightCaps

About this Concert:

A spring breeze moves through these three intimate pieces, each composer in a sunny mood that feels just right on a midwinter evening.

MOZART
Adagio for English Horn and Three Strings

BARTÓK
Duos for Two Violins

NIELSEN
Wind Quintet

More Details:

  • $25 tickets, plus one complimentary beverage ($10 for patrons attending the 6pm performance).
  • Mozart’s Adagio was left incomplete at his death—only a melody line for English horn and unspecified accompanying instruments. Amazingly, even as a fragment, this is one of his most beautiful creations, with an echo of his popular choral masterpiece Ave Verum Corpus.
  • Nielsen’s Wind Quintet is one of the prickly Dane’s sunniest pieces, and you can practically feel a warm breeze in every bar.
  • Béla Bartók created these 44 short, virtuosic and peppery duos based on folk tunes from his homeland—so wherever two violinists meet, they’ve got fun repertoire to play.

Complete event details »

About this Concert:

For an April evening, here’s chamber music as warm and original as a spring shower after the long winter.

SAINT-SAËNS
Septet for Piano, Trumpet and Strings

PROKOFIEV
Quintet in G minor for Oboe, Clarinet, Violin, Viola and Double Bass

More Details:

  • $25 tickets, plus one complimentary beverage ($10 for patrons attending the 8pm performance).
  • Saint-Saëns’ Septet is unlike just about any other chamber piece in that, one moment it echoes centuries of lush strings-and-piano masterpieces—then here comes a playful trumpet!
  • In the mid-1920s, the Russian Prokofiev was living in Paris and a traveling ballet troupe with five instrumentalists asked him to write a piece for them. After creating his ballet Trapeze, he kept going and wrote his Quintet for the same lucky ensemble.
  • Every winter with good snow, St. Paul native David Williamson puts away his bass after rehearsal and straps on his skis to train for a cross-country marathon.

Complete event details »

About this Concert:

Music Director Osmo Vänskä trades his conductor’s baton for his clarinet to perform alongside Minnesota Orchestra musicians in Schubert’s unique and lively Octet, an hour of music that’s jovial, warm and delightful.

SCHUBERT
Octet in F major for Strings and Winds

More Details:

  • This will mark the first Orchestra Hall performance of this euphoric chamber work by Franz Schubert.
  • Although Schubert was ill and reclusive when he wrote the Octet, this music is jovial, warm and delightful, with just a few enigmatic moments scattered throughout its six movements.
  • Schubert’s Octet, which is considered a companion piece to Beethoven’s well-known Septet, was commissioned by arts patron and amateur clarinetist Count Ferdinand von Troyer, who loved Beethoven’s chamber music and believed that Schubert could create similar music.
  • Schubert chose to write an octet by adding one violin to Beethoven’s Septet instrumentation. In his mind, this enriched the music and made it his own.

Complete event details »

About this Concert:

Four pieces from the beginning, middle and end of the 20th century shine a bright spotlight on the members of the Minnesota Orchestra’s woodwind and string sections.

PROKOFIEV
String Quartet No. 1

RAVEL
Sonata for Violin and Piano

VILLA-LOBOS
Trio for Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon

SCHOENFIELD
Trio for Clarinet, Violin and Piano

More Details:

  • Prokofiev was busy giving piano concerts all over Russia just before he wrote his First String Quartet. On long train rides between venues, he pored over Beethoven’s string quartets and those infused his imagination as he started writing his own quartet.
  • Brazil’s Heitor Villa-Lobos makes a serious entry for most prolific composer ever; more than 2,000 scores bear his name.
  • Ravel was smitten by a new style of music from America he heard in Paris cafés after World War I; the composer known for oh-so-French music gave the title Blues to the middle movement of his 1922 Violin Sonata.

Photos © Joel Larson and Josh Kohanek Photography

Complete event details »

About this Concert:

Two late-Romantic beauties, with a tasty brass center between them. It’s a Sunday afternoon dessert for music-lovers!

LOEFFLER
Two Rhapsodies for Oboe, Viola and Piano

SAMPSON
Chesapeake

BRAHMS
String Quartet No. 1

More Details:

  • Charles Martin Loeffler chose a French title for his music, but he was a native of Germany (born Martin Karl Löffler) who landed in Boston in his 20s, and spent the rest of a long, productive life there as a violinist and composer.
  • Johannes Brahms wrote much of his violin music for his friend, Joseph Joachim, who in turn was Loeffler’s violin teacher.
  • Loeffler loved writing for surprising combinations of instruments; his lush Two Rhapsodies for viola, oboe and piano is a perfect example.
  • Brahms was ultra-fussy about writing for string quartet: he pitched his first 20 quartets into various Austrian fireplaces and lakes as he judged none of them good enough for publication.

Photos © Joel Larson and Josh Kohanek Photography

Complete event details »